Cavaliers in Performance Events

U-UD Laughing Brix UD, C-UD, Can CD

U-UD Laughing Brix UD, C-UD, Can CD
PHOTO COURTESY OF FAMILY TREE

Obedience

Brix, pictured at the Cavaliers Of The West Show in Olympia, Washington in September 2001. "Brix," owned and loved by Jane Pitts of Seattle, excels in obedience and therapy work. Her official name with titles is U-UD Laughing Brix UD, C-UD, Can CD.

Brix is the first Cavalier in CKCSC, USA to win the demanding obedience titles of C-CDX and C-UD....and is the #1 ranked Cavalier in obedience in the Front and Finish 2000 Delaney ratings. She is also a Delta Society Pet Partner therapy dog and was nominated for the American Kennel Club's "Award for Canine Excellence" for the year 2000.

 

Agility

For more candid photos from the July 18-19, 2011 Cavalier Agility Trial held in Eagle Point, Oregon. where  17 handlers and 26 Cavaliers participated in this event, and a wonderful time was had by all! Go to the Photo Gallery page under Club info.

 



 

 

 

Rally

Rally is the new dog sport that is taking the nation by storm, a successful stepping stone from the Canine Good Citizen program to the world of obedience or agility. Rally offers both the dogs and handlers an experience that is fun and energizing. The canine team moves at their own pace, very similar to rally-style auto racing. Rally was designed with the traditional pet owner in mind, but it can still be very challenging for those who enjoy higher levels of competition. Rally was created with the thought to put "fun" and participation back in the obedience sector.

Patterns (or courses) are used for the classes with the same pattern is used for everyone in that class. The course is posted before the class begins and exhibitors are allowed to "walk" the course before the actual event takes place. (From CKCSC, USA Rally Obedience information packet)

Rally is a sport in which the dog and handler complete a course that has been designed by the rally judge. The judge tells the handler to begin, and the dog and handler proceed at their own pace through a course of designated stations (10 - 20, depending on the level)Each of these stations has a sign providing instructions regarding the next skill that is to be performed. Scoring is not as rigorous as traditional obedience.

The team of dog and handler moves continuously at a brisk, but normal, pace with the dog under control within a 2-foot area at the handler's left side. There should be a sense of teamwork between the dog and handler both during the numbered exercises and between the exercise signs; however, perfect "heel position" is not required. After the judge's "Forward" order, the team is on its own to complete the entire sequence of numbered signs correctly.

Unlimited communication from the handler to the dog is to be encouraged and not penalized. Unless otherwise specified in these Regulations, handlers are permitted to talk, praise, encourage, clap their hands, pat their legs, or use any verbal means of encouragement. Multiple commands and/or signals using one or both arms and hands are allowed; the handler's arms need not be maintained in any particular position at any time. The handler may not touch the dog or make physical corrections. At any time during the performance, loud or harsh commands or intimidating signals will be penalized.

Rally provides a link from the Canine Good CitizenĀ® (CGC) program to obedience or agility competition, both for dogs and handlers. In addition, rally promotes fun and enjoyment for dogs at all levels of competition.

(From the AKC Rally Section)

Some informative websites about rally obedience:

  • www.akc.org/events/rally/index.cfm
  • www.rallyobedience.com
  • www.jjdog.com (for equipment)

^ back to top